Politics

The genuineness of our indigenousness

What kind of indigenous people struggle to plant food, build shelters, create a balance with their environment and seem unable to build a safe haven in the land they are indigenous to?

Yes, I am referring to black South Africans.

Let me explore a theory that will hopefully force my brothers and sisters to really think – why is it that the indigenous people can’t adapt to their natural environment, yet so-called ‘colonials’ can?

Is it possible that since our people struggle to even put systems and institutions in place to feed ourselves, that it reveals a ‘dark secret’?

Could that ‘dark secret’ be that we are not the true indigenous people of this country, since when we are given free reign over our resources, we don’t know how to use them properly and actually (and horrifyingly) start selling our country to the highest bidder (complete strangers/foreigners).

I hate to say it folks, but it is clear to me that our history of migration, our demonstrated inability to govern and feed and build a self-sustaining African economy/society, is indicative of one fact – Nguni’s apparently are not indigenous to Mzansi!

Should I dare say that only those who can self-sustain, build functional communities, live productively and in harmony with the African land, are the TRUE indigenous inhabitants. I know, I sound like a heretic…

Another way to look at this: There was a man who built a colony by making a rule that anyone who did not work did not eat. This made the people plant food, build shelters and fences to protect themselves from attack.

Here in South Africa, we knowingly elect leaders who let millions of people not work, not eat and whose policies create ‘dumbing down’ and regressive systems that dull our people’s ability to thrive as productive indigenous people. Not to mention that we allow our leaders to destroy the framework of security in our country that we should be able to call our safe haven.

But why would an indigenous people vote for leaders who don’t encourage them to thrive as an indigenous people, leaders who blatantly jeopardise their people’s safe haven?

There seems to be no feasible answer, other than maybe we aren’t the indigenous people after all and that we deceive ourselves, or have been deceived. Why else would we be okay with this?

Maybe it’s time to go back closer to the equator, since this is where our ancestors came from. Where perhaps the rivers, the forests and the environment in general is more conducive to our survival as a people, versus here in Mzansi where our genetic predisposition apparently sets us up for failure, and where non-Nguni’s seem better adjusted to these surroundings…

If I am wrong, then simply prove me wrong by thriving as an indigenous people! Because right now we look like we don’t belong on this land, primarily due to our lack of ability to live as indigenous people would live – we sell it, we pollute it, we corrupt it and we allow politicians to bargain and coerce with it. Yes, we disrespect it! 

But perhaps most concerning, we don’t know how to build a thriving country or how to self-sustain. This is an eye opener and makes me question the genuineness of our indigenousness.

By Siyanda M Maphalala

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Uownit-SA
Uownit-SA is an online publication focused on collecting and publishing valuable and informed opinions from all the people of South Africa, published on the 15th of every month. Send us your views to contributions@uownit-sa.co.za.

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